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Cooler temps, chance for snow start Thornton’s workweek

Monday, February 17th, 2020 5:04am MDT

We are set to once again enter an unsettled period of weather that will last through the first half of the week. Colder temperatures and varying chances for snow will be the notable features that begin today.

The day starts off nice enough with mostly sunny skies above into the afternoon. Winds will become breezy later this morning, initially coming out of the northwest then shifting toward upslope flow out of the northeast. High temperatures today will reach to the low 40s, about five degrees below normal for the date.

We begin to see just slight chances for snow after about 3:00pm and between then and 10:00pm little, if any, accumulation is expected. Tonight, best opportunity for snow comes from 11:00pm to 5:00am when we may see an inch.

Overnight lows will be dropping to the teens.

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February 16 to February 22: This Week in Denver Weather History

Sunday, February 16th, 2020 5:37am MDT

This Week in Denver Weather History

Wind is arguably one of the most frustrating weather conditions and living on the plains of Colorado it is a relatively common occurrence. During February downslope flow brings Chinooks that can create mild temperatures but also can be incredibly powerful. Our look back at this week showcases a number of high wind events that caused extensive damage.

From the National Weather Service:

15-16

In 1889…heavy snowfall totaled 6.7 inches in downtown Denver. Most of the snow…5.5 inches…fell on the 15th when northeast winds were sustained to 18 mph.

In 1921…strong bora winds cooled maximum temperatures from the 60’s on the previous 3 days to 54 degrees on the 15th and to 43 degrees on the 16th. West winds were sustained to 39 mph with gusts to 54 mph on the 15th and to 46 mph with gusts to 56 mph on the 16th.

In 1953…strong…cold northwest winds were widespread from the foothills across the plains. Near gale force winds were observed in Boulder. A wind gust to 54 mph was recorded at Stapleton Airport where blowing dust briefly reduced the visibility to 1 1/2 miles. Damage was minor.

In 1993…an arctic cold front pushed south over the eastern Colorado plains with upslope snow developing behind the front. Snowfall amounts of 3 to 6 inches were common over metro Denver. At Stapleton International Airport…snowfall totaled 4.5 inches and north winds gusted to 25 mph. Temperatures hovered only in the single digits for most of the day. The storm produced up to a foot of snow over southeast Colorado.

In 2006…overnight snowfall in the mountains and eastern foothills contained a lot of red dust and dirt apparently from Arizona. Strong southwest winds with gusts to 100 mph in the San Juan Mountains on the 15th created widespread blowing dust. This red dust became entrained in snowfall across the area. The reddish colored snow was reported in Ward…Nederland…Blackhawk…and Boulder. The storm produced only 0.9 inch of snowfall in the Stapleton area of Denver with 4 to 5 inches measured in the foothills.

15-17

In 1938…a cold air mass brought a light snowfall of 6.2 inches over 3 days to downtown Denver where northeast winds were sustained to 18 mph on the 15th.
16

In 1879…a sudden burst of 3 inches of snow in less than 90 minutes stopped the street cars in downtown Denver during the late afternoon. Melted snow resulted in 0.16 inch of precipitation. Small soft hail also fell when the snow began. A gentleman caught on the prairie between Denver and Morrison described the event as the most severe storm of the winter while it lasted.

In 1885…a windstorm caused severe damage in the city. The strong winds blew all afternoon and most of the evening. West winds were sustained to 62 mph. The strong winds blew down signs and broke windows. Buggies and vehicles of all kinds were blown over. Smokestacks and chimneys were toppled. Roofs were blown off. The Denver and Rio Grande Railroad car shop was partially unroofed and had a wall blown down. Three railroad cars were blown off the track. Many fences were damaged.

In 1897…west winds were sustained to 46 mph with gusts to 56 mph.

In 1912…northwest winds were sustained to 44 mph with a measured extreme velocity to 45 mph.

In 1921…west winds were sustained to 46 mph.

In 1972…wind gusts to 58 mph were recorded at the National Bureau of Standards in Boulder. In downtown Boulder…a wind gust to 51 mph was measured. Northwest winds gusted to 41 mph at Stapleton International Airport.

In 1988…snowfall totaled 3 to 6 inches across metro Denver… But 9 inches were measured in both Wheat Ridge and Evergreen. At Stapleton International Airport…3.4 inches of snow fell and northeast winds gusted to 26 mph. The strong winds blew a scaffold against a hotel in downtown Denver…breaking three windows.

In 1995…high winds occurred in the foothills behind a departing winter storm. A wind gust to 91 mph was recorded at Rollinsville with a gust to 82 mph atop Squaw Mountain west of Denver. West winds gusted to only 20 mph at Stapleton International Airport.

In 2014…a peak wind gust to 59 mph…from the west…was recorded at Denver International Airport.

16-17

In 1929…strong west winds gusting to 84 mph raked Boulder and Lafayette. Limited minor damage and a few injuries occurred.

In 1986…strong Chinook winds continued to howl in the foothills. A wind gust to 89 mph was recorded at Table Mesa in Boulder on the 16th. Winds of 60 to 75 mph were clocked at other locations in Boulder on both days. A west wind gust to 51 mph was recorded at Stapleton International Airport on the 16th.

In 2014…high winds developed briefly overnight in and near the foothills of Boulder and Jefferson Counties. Peak wind reports included: 98 mph…4 miles north-northwest of White Ranch Open Space; 85 mph at the NCAR Mesa Lab; 78 mph at the Junction of Colorado Highways 93 and 172; and 75 mph just southeast of Morrison. A semi-truck and an SUV pulling a trailer were rolled over by the wind on Colorado 470 near Morrison. Strong winds damaged a home under construction in Lakewood.

16-18

In 1970…a wind gust to 90 mph was recorded in Boulder at the National Center for Atmospheric Research. In downtown Boulder…sustained winds of 30 to 40 mph with gusts to 53 mph were measured. Damage was minor. West winds gusted to 45 mph at Stapleton International Airport on the 17th. The strong Chinook winds warmed the temperature to 70 degrees on the 16th and to 72 degrees on the 17th…both records for the date. The low temperature dipped to only 32 degrees on the 16th equaling the record high minimum for the date.

17

In 1887…west winds were sustained to 64 mph. Strong winds occurred all day long in the city. Rainfall was 0.02 inch.

In 1894…northwest winds were sustained to 40 mph with gusts to 46 mph.

In 1937…northwest winds sustained to 36 mph with gusts to 44 mph started a few minor fires and broke a number of plate-glass windows in downtown Denver office buildings.

In 1962…heavy snowfall totaled 7.5 inches at Stapleton Airport where the visibility was reduced to as low as 1/4 mile at times. Winds gusted from the northeast at only 15 mph.

In 2009…strong prefrontal wind gusts knocked down some trees and power lines in Boulder. More than 3400 Xcel customers in the University Hill area were without power for about one hour. Peak wind gusts included 68 mph at the NCAR Mesa Lab and 60 mph in Boulder.

17-18

In 1976…a strong cold front produced wind gusts 30 to 60 mph with much blowing snow and severe dust storms. In the Boulder area…high winds collapsed a garage and broke some windows. Northwest winds gusted to 43 mph on the 17th and to 44 mph on the 18th at Stapleton International Airport.

In 1984…the third blizzard in a week struck eastern Colorado. Heavy snow hit some parts of metro Denver with 8 to 10 inches measured in Aurora…but only 2.9 inches of snow fell at Stapleton International Airport where northwest winds gusted to 31 mph.

In 1999…damaging downslope bora winds developed in the foothills behind a strong cold front. Peak wind reports included: 90 mph at the Gamow Tower on the University of Colorado campus in Boulder; 79 mph at the National Center for Atmospheric Research mesa lab near Boulder and at the national wind technology center south of Boulder; and 72 mph atop Blue Mountain and at Jefferson County Airport. Downed power lines caused major outages for at least 10 thousand residents in Evergreen…Idaho Springs…Golden… And Lakewood. In Golden…the wind toppled a lightning static protection line atop a 70-foot…230 thousand-volt distribution tower. The downed line…sparked a small grass fire just east of the Lookout Mountain Youth Services Center. The fire burned a path approximately 100 yards wide and 1/3 mile long before it was contained.

In 2000…snow…heavy in the mountains and foothills…spread over metro Denver. Snowfall totaled 24 inches at the Eldora Ski Resort with 8 inches measured near Blackhawk. Snowfall was only 1.8 inches at the site of the former Stapleton International Airport…which was the only measurable snow of the month.

17-19

In 2006…a cold spell resulted in 4 temperature records. Low temperatures of 10 degrees below zero on the 17th… 13 degrees below zero on the 18th…and 4 degrees below zero on the 19th were record minimums for those dates. The high temperature of only 7 degrees on the 18th was a record low maximum for the date. Light snow fell on the 17th…but totaled less than half an inch at Denver International Airport.

18

In 1918…post-frontal northwest winds were sustained to 40 mph with a measured extreme velocity to 44 mph.

In 1937…a moderate duststorm occurred during the late afternoon and early evening. Northeast winds sustained to 32 mph with gusts to 41 mph reduced the visibility to 1/2 mile which persisted for about 40 minutes in the city.

In 1998…rare thunder from instability rain and snow showers was heard in Littleton during the late afternoon. Thunder in February only occurs about once every 10 years over metro Denver.

18-19

In 1954…a vigorous cold front produced north winds gusting to 56 mph and a trace of snowfall at Stapleton Airport on the 18th. Strong and gusty winds to 55 mph persisted through the next day and caused some blowing dust.

In 1955…a storm dumped heavy snow across metro Denver. At Stapleton Airport where north winds sustained to 28 mph produced some blowing snow…snowfall totaled 8.8 inches.
18-20 in 1913…post-frontal snowfall totaled 6.9 inches in downtown Denver over the 3 days. Most of the snow fell on the 19th. Northeast winds were sustained to 21 mph with a measured extreme velocity to 24 mph on the 18th.

In 1924…light snowfall totaled 4.6 inches over the 3 days. This was the only measurable snowfall of the month. High temperatures plunged from 45 degrees on the 18th to 17 degrees on the 20th. Low temperatures dipped from 31 degrees on the 18th to only 8 degrees on the 20th. Northeast winds were sustained to 24 mph on the 19th.

In 1953…a major blizzard dumped 10.6 inches of snowfall at Stapleton Airport. Strong north winds at sustained speeds of 25 to 35 mph with gusts as high as 44 mph frequently reduced visibilities to 1/4 mile in blowing snow during the day of the 19th. The strong winds caused much drifting snow…making accurate snowfall measurements almost impossible. Precipitation from the storm totaled 1.13 inches. The 1.01 inches of precipitation on the 19th was the greatest calendar day and 24 hour precipitation ever recorded in the city during the month of February.

In 1987…large amounts of new snow fell in the Front Range foothills. The foothills received 10 to 20 inches of new snow with 4 to 8 inches on the adjacent plains. On the 19th…flight delays occurred at Stapleton International Airport where snowfall totaled 4.2 inches and east winds gusted to only 18 mph on the 19th. Schools were closed in the foothills above Boulder.

» Click here to read the rest of February 16 to February 22: This Week in Denver Weather History

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Thornton’s weekend to offer seasonal temperatures, calm conditions

Friday, February 14th, 2020 4:57am MDT

Finally a much-needed break from the seemingly constant string of storms we have been experiencing. We will enjoy calm conditions this weekend with varying temperatures not far from average.

For Friday, some patchy, early fog may be seen but then sunny skies will dominate the day. Temperatures see a nice bump with highs in the mid-40s. Tonight, a weak disturbance will be moving through. That will lead to partly cloudy skies and lows in the low 20s.

Due to the system, cooler temperatures will be seen Saturday with highs in the low 40s. We will still enjoy a good dose of sun though. Saturday night into Sunday, partly cloudy skies will be above with lows in the low 20s.

Sunday will be the warmest day of the period but also offer more clouds. Look for highs in the mid to upper 40s under partly sunny skies.

Our next storm system arrives Sunday night and is expected to bring a return of snow Monday and Tuesday. Until then, enjoy the break!

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Thornton’s Thursday to see things dry out, temps remain cold

Thursday, February 13th, 2020 4:45am MDT

Yet another storm system has moved through and dropped some snow (2.9 inches) and now we get a break. Skies will clear today but temperatures will remain well below normal.

Partly clear skies start us off then clouds ease through the morning leading to mostly clear skies this afternoon. Highs today will top out right near the freezing mark.

Tonight, skies will remain clear with lows dropping into the teens.

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Yet another storm system set to deliver a bit of snow to Thornton Wednesday

Wednesday, February 12th, 2020 5:06am MDT

There is no rest for the snow-weary this month. Another system arrives today bringing more cold and another shot of snow.

We start out with mostly to partly sunny skies. Cloud cover will slowly be increasing through the day. As the cold front pushes through, look for winds to pick up and become quite breezy by late morning and lasting into the evening. Temperatures today will only top out in the mid-30s.

After noon we begin to see a slight chance for snow to develop with increasing chances as the afternoon progresses. Best opportunity looks to come from 5:00pm to 9:00pm. Areas to our west and south look to be the primary recipients of snow with Thornton looking at an inch or two. However, this will bear close watch as much like some of our recent storms, this one does have the potential to over perform depending on how it plays out.

Tonight, any snow should end around midnight and skies will be clearing. Overnight lows are going to be quite cold with lows in the single digits.

All the latest on our Winter Weather Briefing Page.

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Tuesday to offer lots of sun but temps remain well below normal

Tuesday, February 11th, 2020 5:12am MDT

Our latest storm system has moved out after having dropped another 1.8 inches of snow in Thornton. In its wake, we will see a return to sunny skies but it will remain cold.

The day starts with partly clear skies and some fog in some low-lying areas like along the South Platte River. Skies will begin to clear this morning and sunny skies will be the rule from mid to late morning on. Temperatures start out very cold and will remain below normal with highs today only coming near the freezing mark.

Tonight, partly cloudy skies will be above with overnight lows in the low teens.

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Thornton’s workweek starts with cold temps, another shot of snow

Monday, February 10th, 2020 5:17am MDT

We are not quite ready to break out of the unsettled weather pattern yet. Today will again bring a dose of wintry weather with its greatest impact potentially hitting during the PM rush hour.

The day starts off with mostly clear skies. Some spots will see some patchy fog early so caution will need to be exercised. Clouds will be increasing through the morning and early afternoon. High temperatures today will likely fall short of the freezing mark by a couple of degrees.

Some light flurries will be seen as early as noon with things picking up after 3:00pm and the best chances coming from 5:00pm to 8:00pm. After that, snow will decrease and end before dawn tomorrow.

The National Weather Service has issued a Winter Weather Advisory that will be in effect from 5:00pm this evening to 2:00am tomorrow morning, mainly due to the snow’s potential impact on rush hour. 1 to 4 inches will be possible with 1 to 2 likely for Thornton.

Overnight lows tonight will be quite cold, dipping to around 10 degrees.

Our Winter Weather Briefing Page is the place for the latest.

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February 9 to February 15: This Week in Denver Weather History

Sunday, February 9th, 2020 5:41am MDT

This Week in Denver Weather History

Our look back at this week in Denver weather history contains many of the types of events we would expect to find. Periods of extended arctic chill, heavy snowstorms and damaging wind events.

From the National Weather Service:

31-12

In 1899…a protracted cold spell lasted almost two weeks. Low temperatures plunged below zero on all days but February 9th with a reading of 6 degrees. The coldest low temperature of 22 degrees below zero on February 6th was a record low for the date. Low temperatures of 20 degrees below zero occurred on both February 11th and 12th… But only the 11th remains as the record minimum for the date. High temperature of only 5 degrees below zero on February 11th was a record low maximum for the date. High temperatures climbed to only zero degrees on both February 2nd and 3rd…but were not records. Intermittent light snow or flurries fell during the period. The most snowfall…2.0 inches…occurred on February 2nd.

1-9

In 1883…a protracted cold period occurred when low temperatures dipped below zero for 9 consecutive days. Low temperatures ranged from 22 degrees below zero on the 4th to 2 degrees below zero on the 1st and 6th. High temperatures ranged from 10 below zero on the 3rd to 23 on the 9th. Several temperature records were set that still stand today. Record lows of 18 below and 22 below zero occurred on the 3rd and 4th. Record low maximum readings of 2 below and 10 below zero occurred on the 2nd and 3rd. The high of only 10 below zero on the 3rd is the coldest maximum temperature ever recorded in Denver.

5-11

In 1978…the 5th marked the start of a record 7 consecutive days of dense fog at Stapleton International Airport. The heavy fog reduced the visibility to 1/4 mile or less for a period of time on each of these days. Light snow and/or freezing drizzle occurred on most days. Fog reducing visibility to less than 7 miles was recorded at Stapleton International Airport on 11 consecutive days through the 15th. During the period 5-14…the cold thick fog deposited heavy rime ice up to 5 inches thick on power lines and poles over a wide area of eastern Colorado…causing a major electrical power outage disaster.

6-10

In 1933…3:00 pm on the 6th marked the start of a protracted cold period through 8:00 am on the 10th when the temperature was below zero for 86 out of 88 hours. The cold period was interrupted on the 8th at 9:00 am when the temperature was 1 degree above zero and at 10:00 am when the temperature was 8 degrees above zero. Four temperature records were set. High temperatures of 4 degrees below zero on the 7th…8 degrees on the 8th…and 5 degrees below zero on the 9th were record low maximums for those dates. The only record low temperature record was 14 degrees below zero on the 10th. The lowest temperature reached during the period was 16 degrees below zero on both the 7th and 8th…which were not records.

8-9

In 1898…rain changed rapidly to snow during the late evening of the 8th and continued through the early afternoon of the 9th. Snowfall totaled 6.0 inches in the city. Northeast winds were sustained to 26 mph with gusts to 30 mph on the 8th.

In 2001…heavy snow fell across metro Denver mainly in and near the eastern foothills. Snow totals included: 12 inches atop Crow Hill and near Evergreen; 10 inches in Evergreen and near Morrison; 9 inches at Genesee; 8 inches atop Lookout Mountain and near Littleton and Bailey; 6 inches at Arvada and Ken Caryl Ranch; and 5 inches in Broomfield…Chief Hosa… And Thornton. Snowfall totaled 5.1 inches at the site of the former Stapleton International Airport. Temperatures dipped to 15 degrees below zero at Denver International Airport on the morning of the 9th…setting a new record minimum for the date.

In 2002…high winds in the foothills on the 8th spread over the plains on the 9th and caused much blowing dust and snow and blizzard conditions east and northeast of metro Denver. I-70 was closed from just east of Denver to the Kansas state line. Zero visibilities coupled with snowpacked and slick roads caused multiple car accidents in southern weld County. High winds developed in the foothills on the 8th with gusts to 71 mph on Rocky Flats and to 75 mph at the National Center for Atmospheric Research mesa lab in Boulder. The high winds continued on the 9th with gusts to 83 mph near Fritz Peak…70 mph at Evergreen…and 67 mph at Parker. Northwest winds gusted to 55 mph on the 8th and to 58 mph on the 9th at Denver International Airport where the surface visibility was reduced to as low as 1 mile in blowing dust on the 9th.

In 2008…strong downslope winds developed in and near the Front Range foothills. Peak gusts included: 88 mph at Georgetown…85 mph at Berthoud Pass…81 mph at the NCAR Mesa Lab…78 mph at the national wind technology center… At 76 mph at Floyd Hill. At Denver International Airport… Gusty west winds to 48 mph were observed on the 8th.

9

In 1886…north winds were sustained to 42 mph…the highest winds of the month that year.

In 1893…northwest bora downslope winds were sustained to to 40 mph with gusts as high as 70 mph in the city.

In 1960…the lowest pressure reduced to sea level ever recorded in Denver…28.83 inches (976.4 mb.)…occurred. The actual station pressure of 23.770 inches was also the lowest ever recorded.

In 1967…northwest winds gusted to 51 mph at Stapleton International Airport. Winds were strong and gusty all day.

In 1988…high winds occurred in and near the foothills. Winds gusted to 96 mph in east Boulder. As many as 1600 homes lost power when wires were downed by the wind. Some windows were blown out of cars near Rocky Flats south of Boulder where winds were clocked at 85 mph. In Broomfield…winds were recorded to 68 mph at Jefferson County Airport.

In 2009…high winds occurred in and near the foothills of Boulder and northern Jefferson counties. Peak wind gusts included 81 mph at the national wind technology center and 6 miles northwest of Boulder.

9-10

In 1934…rain changed to heavy snow on the afternoon of the 9th and continued through the day on the 10th. Snowfall totaled 7.4 inches in downtown Denver. North winds were sustained to 24 mph on the 10th.

In 1972…heavy post-frontal snowfall totaled 6.2 inches at Stapleton International Airport where northeast winds gusted to 46 mph on the 9th. Temperatures plunged from a high of 51 degrees on the 9th to a low of 16 on the morning of the 10th.

In 1981…the season’s coldest arctic air mass rolled into metro Denver plunging temperatures from 10 below to 20 degrees below zero. Bitter north winds gusting as high as 36 mph sent wind chill temperatures to 50 below zero. Two to four inches of snow fell over metro Denver with 6 to 12 inches in the foothills. A Boulder man died of hypothermia while cross country skiing in the mountains west of the city. Snowfall totaled only 1.5 inches at Stapleton International Airport where the minimum temperature on the morning of the 10th was 5 degrees below zero. The temperature that day warmed to a high of only 9 degrees.

In 2003…high winds occurred in and near the eastern foothills. The highest wind gusts recorded: included 80 mph atop Fritz Peak and 73 mph atop Blue Mountain and at the National Wind Technology Center on Rocky Flats south of Boulder. At least 4 multi-car accidents occurred along State Highway 93…between Golden and Boulder when blowing snow caused whiteout conditions. Northwest winds gusted to 36 mph at Denver International Airport on the 10th.

9-11

In 1965…heavy snowfall totaled 6.2 inches at Stapleton International Airport where northeast winds gusted to 25 mph.

In 1993…the same storm that dumped heavy snow in the mountains combined with an arctic cold front to produce heavy snow across metro Denver. Upslope snows of 4 to 8 inches were common with some areas receiving nearly a foot. Ten inches of new snow were measured in Parker and 7 inches in southeast Denver. At Stapleton International Airport… Snowfall totaled 8.1 inches. Strong winds combined with the snowfall to produce near-blizzard conditions over the plains closing many roads east of Denver. North winds gusted to only 18 mph at Stapleton International Airport on the 9th.

10

In 1890…north winds were sustained to 48 mph with gusts as high as 60 mph behind an apparent cold front. Light snow also fell.

In 1932…a large cumulo-nimbus thunderhead was observed in the eastern sky at 4:00 pm. Thunderstorms are relatively rare in February.

In 1990…northwest winds gusted to 52 mph at Stapleton International Airport. The strong Chinook winds warmed the temperature to a high of 56 degrees.

In 1999…a vigorous cold front moved a wall of blowing dust across the plains of northeastern Colorado during the afternoon and early evening hours. While the strongest winds and wind damage were north and east of metro Denver… North to northeast winds did gust to 48 mph at Denver International Airport…reducing the visibility to as low as 3/4 mile in blowing dust. The temperature dropped as much as 15 degrees in 5 minutes and 21 degrees in 30 minutes following the passage of the cold front. Dangerous wind shear conditions at DIA delayed several flights…while others were redirected to Colorado Springs. In the Montbello area of northeast Denver…the strong winds blew the roof off a building. Downed power lines sparked a small brush fire…which burned about 10 acres near the former Fitzsimmons Army Medical Center.

» Click here to read the rest of February 9 to February 15: This Week in Denver Weather History

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Thornton’s weekend will be bookended by snow with a nice day in between

Friday, February 7th, 2020 5:32am MDT

We will be seeing a little bit of everything this weekend. One storm wraps up today and Saturday will be relatively pleasant but another storm arrives Sunday and looks to bring more snow.

As of 4:00am this morning, Thornton was sitting at 4.5 inches of snow. Light snow will be possible throughout the day with another inch or two possible. Should a heavier snow band pass through, that number could jump. A Winter Weather Advisory remains in Effect until midnight tonight. Temperatures will remain cold with highs around freezing.

Snow will be wrapping up entirely by about sunset and skies will begin to clear overnight. Lows tonight will be in the mid to upper teens.

Saturday will be the most pleasant day of the three day period. Mostly sunny skies will be above with highs in the mid-40s although the lingering snow cover might suppress temperatures and keep them from warming that much.

Cloud cover will increase after dark tomorrow night signifying the arrival of our next storm system. Snow becomes possible from about 10:00pm Saturday evening with chances continuing throughout the day Sunday.

Right now this looks to be a relatively minor event with an inch or two accumulation possible however that could change as it gets closer. Highs on Sunday will remain below freezing.

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Cool temperatures and clouds for Thornton’s Thursday, next storm arrives tonight

Thursday, February 6th, 2020 5:10am MDT

Lots going on in the weather for today and tomorrow but also with a lot of uncertainty. We’ll start out nice enough today but a coming storm has prompted a Winter Weather Advisory to be issued.

For today, partly clear skies start us off but cloud cover will increase in the morning. This afternoon we will be mostly cloudy. Temperatures today will top out around the 40 degree mark.

Some flurries may be seen as early as 4:00pm with the best chances coming after 6:00pm this evening and through Friday morning. Light, steady snow will fall overnight with lows dipping to the low 20s. How much snow? That is the hard part.

Models have not been consistent with the track of this storm system plus some indicate the potential for convective snow bands which would drive up any potential totals where the bands pass. For now, the National Weather Service has issued a Winter Weather Advisory calling for 3 to 6 inches with the potential for localized amount up to 10 inches. For Thornton we don’t feel like that is off the mark.

Hopefully coming model runs will coalesce around a more coherent solution in the coming hours. For now, be aware and be prepared for possibly rough driving conditions tomorrow.

Our Winter Weather Briefing Page has all the latest.

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