36°F
Thornton, Colorado, USA
UpdatedTue, 07-Dec-2021 9:10pm MST 
 

Navigation

ThorntonWeather.com on Twitter

ThorntonWeather.com on Facebook

 

Weather Geek Stuff - weathergeekstuff.com

Rocky Mountain Weather Network

Tony's Takes Photography



NCAR: Arctic ice might shrink due to global warming… Or it might not

Sunday, August 14th, 2011 5:16pm MST
Arctic sea ice has long been thought to be a harbinger of climate change. A new study indicates that it is as likely to grow as shrink in the coming years. Credit: UCAR / Carlye Calvin

Arctic sea ice has long been thought to be a harbinger of climate change. A new study indicates that it is as likely to grow as shrink in the coming years. Credit: UCAR / Carlye Calvin

Having seen many of their predictions proven false, climate change alarmists have taken on a new tact in the last couple of years – whether hot or cold, snowy or balmy, manmade climate change is to blame. A new study from NCAR continues that trend saying Arctic ice may shrink or it may grow, take your pick.

A new study by scientists at the National Center for Atmospheric Research (NCAR) shows that Arctic sea ice is “as likely to expand as it is to contract for periods of up to about a decade.”

NCAR scientist Jennifer Kay, the lead author of the study said, “The computer simulations suggest that we could see a 10-year period of stable ice or even a slight increase in the extent of the ice.  Even though the observed ice loss has accelerated over the last decade, the fate of sea ice over the next decade depends not only on human activity but also on climate variability that cannot be predicted.”

Utilizing a single climate model, the study authors speculate that fluctuations in the sea ice will increase due to a warming climate and thinning ice.

Carbon dioxide (CO2) and other gases are not the only reason for the decline of the ice.

Scientists attributed half of the decline to “climate variability.”  This seems at odds with the results from the UN’s IPCC’s AR4 report which dismisses natural climate variability as a reason for increased global temperatures.

The statement from NCAR said that the computer model used by the scientists “has certain biases” however it is unclear how that would have affected the results of the modeling that was performed.  A recent study has demonstrated that computer models are significantly underestimating the Earth’s ability to dissipate heat.

Reliable sea ice measurements have only become a reality since 1979 when satellites started observations.  However, data suggests that as recently as 5,500 years ago during the Holocene Thermal Maximum the Arctic had considerably less ice than what it does today.

This story was originally published on Examiner.com.  Be sure to check out the Climate Change Examiner for the latest global warming and climate change news.

Tags: , ,

Leave a Comment

*